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Monologues’ not what we need

Christina Dehan | Tuesday, February 10, 2004

I am a woman. I have never been sexually abused but have close relatives and friends who have been. I have read the “Monologues.” With that said, upon reading the “Monologues,” I was deeply offended and felt that my femininity was grievously degraded. I have been saddened to see so many of my sisters in Christ promoting them as a means of empowering women.What is needed to combat violence against women in the world is a complete paradigm shift. We, as women and men created in the image of God, need to stop seeing women as objects, as mere products of negative experiences, or as a body part, and start seeing them as whole persons, as beautiful expressions of God’s love.Then, and only then, will women start respecting themselves, not for the control they can have over their bodies, not for the pleasure they can give themselves, not for the power they can have over men, but because they are created and radically loved by God. If we aim to eliminate all forms of violence against women, we should hardly employ violence as our means. The “Monologues” are violent emotionally, psychologically and spiritually. If we see women as having intrinsic, God-given dignity, then we should highlight that dignity and not do further damage to it.Even if the content of the “Monologues” was not violent, in many places where they are shown (although not at Notre Dame) some of the proceeds go to Planned Parenthood, which through its unqualified support of abortion and contraception completely undermines the value and dignity of women in this country. Even though the proceeds from Notre Dame’s show will not go to Planned Parenthood, an injustice to women anywhere is an injustice to women everywhere.I encourage all women on this campus to re-examine the way they view themselves and their sisters (and brothers) in Christ. We deserve better than the “Monologues.” Let’s look to the Blessed Mother for a monologue that is truly empowering.

Christina DehanjuniorBadin HallFeb. 10