-

The Observer is a Student-run, daily print & online newspaper serving Notre Dame & Saint Mary's. Learn more about us.

-

archive

Cameos provide bright spots in teen comedy

Molly Griffin | Monday, October 25, 2004

To many people, Europe is seen as the pinnacle of art, culture and society. To others, like the producers of “Eurotrip,” it is a land free from the puritanical rules and restrictions of America, perfect for satisfying their target demographic of hormone-addled, adolescent boys. “Eurotrip” is rife with politically incorrect jokes, stereotypical portrayals of the various European nations and bathroom humor, and while not at the top of the gross-out, teen-movie heap, still manages to have some funny moments. The film follows Scotty (Scott Mechlowicz), a high school senior, who gets dumped by his girlfriend (Kristen Kreuk of “Smallville” fame) on graduation day. His longtime German pen pal, Mieke, consoles him after the breakup and suggests they meet up in America. Thinking Mieke is pronounced “Mike” and his pen pal is male, Scotty fears he is being hit on by a man and tells Mieke never to speak to him again. He subsequently finds out that Mieke not only is a girl, but is a very attractive one, so he decides to shed his cautious personality and go to Germany to make the situation right again. Joined by his best friend, Cooper (Jacob Pitts), they travel to London because they don’t have enough money to make it to Germany by plane. They meet up with their friends who are fraternal twins, Jamie (Travis Wester) and Jenny (Michelle Trachenberg). Once in Europe, the four have misadventures in London with a busload of soccer hooligans who are obsessed with Manchester United; visit a nude beach in France that has more men than women; partake of brownies and the red light district in Amsterdam; meet an extremely friendly Italian on the train; have a detour into Eastern Europe; take a brief stop in Germany and finally have a sacrilegious time at the Vatican. The movie has a surprising number of cameos from established stars, and they usually end up being the best parts of the movie. Matt Damon appears as the lead singer of a band who is having an affair with Scotty’s girlfriend. The song about their tryst, “Scotty Doesn’t Know,” is definitely one of the best parts of the movie and will remain stuck in your head long after the movie has ended. Lucy Lawless, once television’s “Xena: Warrior Princess,” vamps it up as a dominatrix at an Amsterdam brothel, complete with a thick and unidentifiable accent. Rounding out these appearances are David Hasselhoff, Jeffrey Tambor (“Arrested Development”), Diedrich Bader (“The Drew Carey Show”) and Vinnie Jones (“Snatch”) as an obsessed Manchester United fan. The DVD’s extras depend on whether or not you secure the “rated” or “unrated” version, the only difference between the two being the amount of nudity and profanity in the film. The film’s writers include two commentary tracks: the “sober” and the “party”, the latter done under the influence of a few drinks. There are a significant number of deleted scenes, featurettes such as “Nude Beach Exposed”, a video and sing-along for “Scotty Doesn’t Know” and “Eurotrip Bootleg”, in which the writers comment on the quality of a bootleg copy of the film they picked up months before the actual DVD release. Overall, “Eurotrip” is not a great movie, but it isn’t a bad one either, and it has just enough funny moments and guest appearances to make it worth watching.