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Sunday night

Dustin Mennella | Monday, November 19, 2007

Sunday is a day of many interests – the day of rest for the religious, NFL football for the sports fans, and of color comics in the newspaper. It’s the day banks and other government buildings are frustratingly closed, and the day playing Dominoes is forbidden in Alabama (at least according to Wikipedia).

Up until college, Sunday was just another day for me, perhaps a chance to do some last minute homework for some class or other, but nothing special, besides it being the weekend still. But all that changed when I moved into Keough four years ago – since that time, Sundays have become for me (and hopefully shall ever be) movie night.

As the name implies, after dorm mass every Sunday my friends and I would congregate in our quad and take an hour or two to watch a movie. However busy our coming week looked, we stuck to our ritual, through good movies and bad. Sometimes the bad ones were just as entertaining, with clever and sarcastic comments increasing at each instance of bad acting.

I remember an especially horrible Halloween movie, Deer Woman, about a murderous half-deer, half-woman who would hide her hooves and lure unsuspecting males into private before trampling them to death.

Since moving off campus my senior year, the Sunday night movie tradition has been harder to keep alive. My roommates and I have signed up for Blockbuster Online, so acquiring movies has become easier, but where in the dorm we could easily get eight or more people just by walking down the halls, it’s now usually just my roommates and I.

The method used in choosing movies so far has been rather haphazard. In the dorms, our choices were limited to the movies one of us owned, though it helped that one of the guys living down the hall had the largest movie collection of anyone I’ve ever met.

Usually the movie was determined by popular vote, but if someone felt they had a particularly good movie they could nominate that movie at their own risk – meaning if the movie ended up not making the cut that was one strike against the nominator.

No one ever accumulated enough strikes to permanently bar them from suggesting future movies, but I think of my friends I got the closest, being banned temporarily on a couple weekends I can remember.

But in the end, it doesn’t matter whether I choose the movie or not, or even if it’s good or bad – just spending that time with friends is always a relaxing and enjoyable experience I can look forward to before the hectic week.