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Police raid Lafayette Apartments

Justin Tardiff | Thursday, March 19, 2009

Saint Patrick’s Day revelry caused University and state law enforcement to crack down on underage drinking Tuesday.

Captain Phil Trent of the South Bend Police Department (SBPD) said the Indiana State Excise Police led a raid at Lafayette Apartments in South Bend Tuesday night.

Trent said he does not know how the Excise Police were made aware of possible underage alcohol consumption in the apartment complex.

He said he does not have details about the outcome of the raid because the SBPD was not involved.

“We were aware of police activity, but didn’t go there until after,” Trent said. “We were in the area, but we didn’t participate.”

The Excise Police could not be reached as of press time.

Notre Dame Security Police (NDSP) also responded an alcohol-related disturbance Tuesday, according to Dave Chapman, assistant director of NDSP.

NDSP was received calls that NDSP students were disrupting class with a parade through campus and responded to those calls between 9:30 and 10:00 a.m., Chapman said.

Senior Nick Hittler organized the parade, which he said included over 100 students and began at the intersection of South Bend and Notre Dame Aves. and continued through campus.

“Everybody was delighted to see us,” Hittler said. “The professors were smiling, the Huddle workers were cheering us on.”

But Hittler conceded that NDSP reacted negatively to the parade.

“We were spreading merriment on St. Patrick’s Day,” he said. “Everybody except NDSP loved us.”

Chapman said NDSP did not make any arrests when breaking up the parade.

“All we did was talk to them and tell them … what you need if you parade through campus,” he said.

NDSP got involved because the parade was disruptive to students and faculty studying in DeBartolo Hall, Chapman said.

“They were impeding the freedom of the community,” Chapman said. “There were people inside [DeBartolo] trying to study and do research.”