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Not a good policy for military, why here?

Joe Sullivan | Wednesday, October 14, 2009

If people can stand one more response to “Don’t ask, don’t tell” (Oct. 7) I would interject the following comment from life experience:

Mr. Mullen suggested that Notre Dame adopt the “don’t ask, don’t tell” policy from the military. He does not go on to explain if that policy is of a benefit to the military.

I would offer that it is not a good policy at all. After almost a decade in uniform, I consider the policy to be one of the most shameful ever enacted. Having served in ground, sea and aviation units, I can attest that the homosexuals I served with were the bravest, most patriotic and competent service members I ever met. Asking them to conceal their sexual orientation in a way that heterosexuals do not have to is a knife in the back to the gay men and women who volunteer to protect America and who may ultimately die in that effort.

If Notre Dame is to look to the policies of other organizations as Mr. Mullen suggests that they should, I recommend not looking to a policy that denies dignity to so many of our fighting men and women and inhibits recruitment of so many other talented individuals. The “don’t ask, don’t tell” policy denigrates every gay American service member that his given his or her life in battle and should not be exported to any other organization.

Joe Sullivan

first year law student

off campus

Oct. 13

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The Observer is a Student-run, daily print & online newspaper serving Notre Dame & Saint Mary's. Learn more about us.

-

archive

Not a good policy for military, why here?

Letter to the Editor | Tuesday, October 13, 2009

If people can stand one more response to “Don’t ask, don’t tell” (Oct. 7) I would interject the following comment from life experience:

Mr. Mullen suggested that Notre Dame adopt the “don’t ask, don’t tell” policy from the military. He does not go on to explain if that policy is of a benefit to the military.

I would offer that it is not a good policy at all. After almost a decade in uniform, I consider the policy to be one of the most shameful ever enacted. Having served in ground, sea and aviation units, I can attest that the homosexuals I served with were the bravest, most patriotic and competent service members I ever met. Asking them to conceal their sexual orientation in a way that heterosexuals do not have to is a knife in the back to the gay men and women who volunteer to protect America and who may ultimately die in that effort.

If Notre Dame is to look to the policies of other organizations as Mr. Mullen suggests that they should, I recommend not looking to a policy that denies dignity to so many of our fighting men and women and inhibits recruitment of so many other talented individuals. The “don’t ask, don’t tell” policy denigrates every gay American service member that his given his or her life in battle and should not be exported to any other organization.

Joe Sullivan

first year law student

off campus

Oct. 13