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Shouldn’t ask, shouldn’t matter

Andy Hills | Friday, October 9, 2009

If someone says he or she has nothing against homosexuals but agrees with the Catholic Church’s teaching on homosexuality, it is a lie. The stance of the Catholic Church is overtly anti-homosexual. To tell a homosexual that it is okay to be gay, but that one cannot act upon those feelings, is an explicit slap in the face.

As if the Catholic Church’s teachings about sexuality were not tyrannical enough, the rules about homosexuality are nearly evil. While heterosexuals are at least permitted to have sex once in a while (under only the most specific of circumstances), homosexuals are never allowed that same opportunity. Why not? “Because it is not procreative,” goes the official answer. The honest answer: it’s weird. Were Notre Dame to adopt a “don’t ask, don’t tell” policy as suggested by Sean Mullen’s letter (Oct. 7), it would not only be morally wrong, but also weaken the university.

In the same way this policy has excluded many competent soldiers from serving in the military, a similar prohibition in this case would repel many intelligent students who are not (and should not be) ashamed of their sexuality. Such a policy would certainly not promote the growth of a great university with greater aspirations.

It is argued that adding sexual orientation to the non-discrimination clause will only further secularize Notre Dame. While the word “secular” carries negative connotations for many religious people, let us all momentarily step out of our box and realize that a secular humanity is making progress in morality and human rights.

On the other hand, the Catholic Church is playing catch up as usual while it continues to hold on to ancient prejudices. Rather than condemn those Notre Dame students who disagree with the Church’s stance on homosexuality, we should encourage them. Perhaps some of these bright Catholic minds can one day help to revise and improve the Church’s faulty and outdated reasoning on this issue

Andy Hills

sophomore

Carroll Hall

Oct. 7

 

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The Observer is a Student-run, daily print & online newspaper serving Notre Dame & Saint Mary's. Learn more about us.

-

archive

Shouldn’t ask, shouldn’t matter

Letter to the Editor | Thursday, October 8, 2009

If someone says he or she has nothing against homosexuals but agrees with the Catholic Church’s teaching on homosexuality, it is a lie. The stance of the Catholic Church is overtly anti-homosexual. To tell a homosexual that it is okay to be gay, but that one cannot act upon those feelings, is an explicit slap in the face.

As if the Catholic Church’s teachings about sexuality were not tyrannical enough, the rules about homosexuality are nearly evil. While heterosexuals are at least permitted to have sex once in a while (under only the most specific of circumstances), homosexuals are never allowed that same opportunity. Why not? “Because it is not procreative,” goes the official answer. The honest answer: it’s weird. Were Notre Dame to adopt a “don’t ask, don’t tell” policy as suggested by Sean Mullen’s letter (Oct. 7), it would not only be morally wrong, but also weaken the university.

In the same way this policy has excluded many competent soldiers from serving in the military, a similar prohibition in this case would repel many intelligent students who are not (and should not be) ashamed of their sexuality. Such a policy would certainly not promote the growth of a great university with greater aspirations.

It is argued that adding sexual orientation to the non-discrimination clause will only further secularize Notre Dame. While the word “secular” carries negative connotations for many religious people, let us all momentarily step out of our box and realize that a secular humanity is making progress in morality and human rights.

On the other hand, the Catholic Church is playing catch up as usual while it continues to hold on to ancient prejudices. Rather than condemn those Notre Dame students who disagree with the Church’s stance on homosexuality, we should encourage them. Perhaps some of these bright Catholic minds can one day help to revise and improve the Church’s faulty and outdated reasoning on this issue

Andy Hills

sophomore

Carroll Hall

Oct. 7