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Unacceptable policy

Andrea Green | Thursday, October 8, 2009

In response to Sean Mullen’s letter, “Don’t ask, don’t tell,” (Oct. 7) I would like to begin by questioning how he can possibly say he has nothing against gay people. As students at Notre Dame, I would hope that we know enough about the policy of “don’t ask, don’t tell” that we would never want to widen the group of people to which that policy applies. To suggest that we subject gay students at Notre Dame to the shameful, condescending and homophobic policy that our military unfortunately still employs is something a person who has nothing against gay people would never consider.

Mullen’s letter suggests that we use a “don’t ask, don’t tell” policy to avoid including gay students, staff and faculty in Notre Dame’s non-discrimination clause. I sincerely hope Mullen is not implying that it is acceptable to tolerate discrimination against members of the Notre Dame community who are openly gay. How does that fit in with the Catholic nature of our University? As a Catholic, you should respect the inherent dignity of every human being, and that means rejecting all forms of discrimination. Furthermore, being openly gay does not necessarily mean practicing homosexuality any more than being straight means that you are actively engaging in sexual activities.

Does Mullen believe that the University should exclude unmarried sexually active heterosexuals from the non-discrimination clause as well? While I’m in no way an expert on Catholic social teachings, I believe it is your responsibility as a Catholic to strive to love everyone, regardless of sexuality. It is detestable to try to hide behind Catholic social teachings to justify a tolerance of discrimination when in fact I believe it calls on you to do the opposite.

Mr. Mullen, I’m horrified that you would like to force our gay friends, neighbors and classmates into the closet just because homosexuality makes you uncomfortable.

Andrea Green

junior

Ryan Hall

Oct. 7
 

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The Observer is a Student-run, daily print & online newspaper serving Notre Dame & Saint Mary's. Learn more about us.

-

archive

Unacceptable policy

Letter to the Editor | Wednesday, October 7, 2009

In response to Sean Mullen’s letter, “Don’t ask, don’t tell,” (Oct. 7) I would like to begin by questioning how he can possibly say he has nothing against gay people. As students at Notre Dame, I would hope that we know enough about the policy of “don’t ask, don’t tell” that we would never want to widen the group of people to which that policy applies. To suggest that we subject gay students at Notre Dame to the shameful, condescending and homophobic policy that our military unfortunately still employs is something a person who has nothing against gay people would never consider.

Mullen’s letter suggests that we use a “don’t ask, don’t tell” policy to avoid including gay students, staff and faculty in Notre Dame’s non-discrimination clause. I sincerely hope Mullen is not implying that it is acceptable to tolerate discrimination against members of the Notre Dame community who are openly gay. How does that fit in with the Catholic nature of our University? As a Catholic, you should respect the inherent dignity of every human being, and that means rejecting all forms of discrimination. Furthermore, being openly gay does not necessarily mean practicing homosexuality any more than being straight means that you are actively engaging in sexual activities.

Does Mullen believe that the University should exclude unmarried sexually active heterosexuals from the non-discrimination clause as well? While I’m in no way an expert on Catholic social teachings, I believe it is your responsibility as a Catholic to strive to love everyone, regardless of sexuality. It is detestable to try to hide behind Catholic social teachings to justify a tolerance of discrimination when in fact I believe it calls on you to do the opposite.

Mr. Mullen, I’m horrified that you would like to force our gay friends, neighbors and classmates into the closet just because homosexuality makes you uncomfortable.

Andrea Green

junior

Ryan Hall

Oct. 7