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We are all ND

Ellen Peralta | Monday, October 12, 2009

Having endured the toils and trials of Catholic education since age five, I feel it’s safe to say I am somewhat well-versed in our church’s stance on homosexuality. So, as a member of the Notre Dame family, Sean Mullen, I’m going to share a quote from our Catechism: “2206 The relationships within the family bring an affinity of feelings, affections and interests, arising above all from the members’ respect for one another.” Stemming from Oct. 7’s colorful Viewpoint, “Don’t ask, don’t tell,” do you feel that you really showed respect for the homosexual members of the Notre Dame family by telling them they should effectively hide their identity because you feel that by being themselves they “can feel better about their sin?”

Sex is described by the Catechism as needing to be between a man and a woman for “2363 The good of the spouses themselves and the transmission of life.” So, if we’re following correctly, the purpose of sex is to share love and make babies. The Church, then, is against any act of sex whose goals or outcomes aren’t those two things. Unfortunately, “practicing homosexuality,” or even using contraceptives, won’t produce life and therefore is a big “no-no” in the Church’s eyes. That, ladies and gentlemen, is why the Church is against the act of practicing homosexuality. Nothing to do with the people, just the act. Think hard and you could conclude that the church is equally against pre-marital sex and sex used with contraceptives. Yet, there aren’t nearly as many prejudices against heterosexuals who technically don’t abide by the catechism in their sexual practices, are there? Clearly, this is an issue of prejudice toward homosexuals which is a shame, because I’ve met some extremely interesting and kind-hearted people here at Notre Dame that just so happen to be gay.

So, Sean Mullen, although you “have nothing against gay people,” your inflammatory “Don’t ask, don’t tell” suggestion and lack of overall tact were offensive, not only to the GLBTQ community of Notre Dame, but to all those lucky enough to call ourselves their friends. Being inclusive doesn’t make us “secular,” it makes us Catholic.

Ellen Peralta

sophomore

Howard Hall

Oct. 8

 

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The Observer is a Student-run, daily print & online newspaper serving Notre Dame & Saint Mary's. Learn more about us.

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archive

We are all ND

Letter to the Editor | Sunday, October 11, 2009

Having endured the toils and trials of Catholic education since age five, I feel it’s safe to say I am somewhat well-versed in our church’s stance on homosexuality. So, as a member of the Notre Dame family, Sean Mullen, I’m going to share a quote from our Catechism: “2206 The relationships within the family bring an affinity of feelings, affections and interests, arising above all from the members’ respect for one another.” Stemming from Oct. 7’s colorful Viewpoint, “Don’t ask, don’t tell,” do you feel that you really showed respect for the homosexual members of the Notre Dame family by telling them they should effectively hide their identity because you feel that by being themselves they “can feel better about their sin?”

Sex is described by the Catechism as needing to be between a man and a woman for “2363 The good of the spouses themselves and the transmission of life.” So, if we’re following correctly, the purpose of sex is to share love and make babies. The Church, then, is against any act of sex whose goals or outcomes aren’t those two things. Unfortunately, “practicing homosexuality,” or even using contraceptives, won’t produce life and therefore is a big “no-no” in the Church’s eyes. That, ladies and gentlemen, is why the Church is against the act of practicing homosexuality. Nothing to do with the people, just the act. Think hard and you could conclude that the church is equally against pre-marital sex and sex used with contraceptives. Yet, there aren’t nearly as many prejudices against heterosexuals who technically don’t abide by the catechism in their sexual practices, are there? Clearly, this is an issue of prejudice toward homosexuals which is a shame, because I’ve met some extremely interesting and kind-hearted people here at Notre Dame that just so happen to be gay.

So, Sean Mullen, although you “have nothing against gay people,” your inflammatory “Don’t ask, don’t tell” suggestion and lack of overall tact were offensive, not only to the GLBTQ community of Notre Dame, but to all those lucky enough to call ourselves their friends. Being inclusive doesn’t make us “secular,” it makes us Catholic.

Ellen Peralta

sophomore

Howard Hall

Oct. 8