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What’s really important

Andrew Lynch | Tuesday, October 13, 2009

I have been totally surprised and utterly disgusted at the gross misinterpretation of Catholic social teaching in viewpoints last week. Therefore, I believe a little refresher in Catholic teaching taken straight from the Catechism is in order. Several people have argued that the Church teaches there is nothing wrong with the fact that someone has homosexual inclinations.This is false, and the Catechism says so: “The [homosexual] inclination, which is objectively disordered, constitutes for most of them a trial.” Homosexuality is wrong in that it is objectively disordered, based upon the natural law and human nature. However we must be clear, homosexual inclinations are disordered, not sinful in themselves. The sin only occurs when an individual takes action on these inclinations.

For heterosexuals and homosexuals alike, engaging in impure sexual thoughts or engaging in sex acts outside marriage are mortal sins. Since homosexual inclinations are not sinful if they are not acted upon, we should not condemn a homosexual person simply because they are homosexual. We need to support our homosexual brothers and sisters, not condemn them. “They must be accepted with respect, compassion and sensitivity. Every unjust discrimination should be avoided.” We must not be homophobic or encourage hateful attitudes towards homosexuals. At the same time, we should not promote or encourage homosexuality or homosexual behavior.

In permitting homosexual groups, or recognition in the non-discrimination policy, we must not simply create a culture of “toleration” and leave it at that. That would be a failure of our Catholic Mission. We should help our homosexual brothers and sisters to live chastely (like we all should), and encourage them that “by prayer and sacramental grace, they can and should gradually and resolutely approach Christian perfection.” This is what groups like Core Council should seek to accomplish. Notre Dame is still a Catholic university, and as such, it has a solemn duty to teach and impart the teachings of the Catholic Church, particularly with regards to the natural law, on its students. And until Notre Dame comes toppling down from the golden dome, it should remain that way.

Andrew Lynch

freshman

Morrissey Manor

Oct. 11
 

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The Observer is a Student-run, daily print & online newspaper serving Notre Dame & Saint Mary's. Learn more about us.

-

archive

What’s really important

Letter to the Editor | Tuesday, October 13, 2009

I have been totally surprised and utterly disgusted at the gross misinterpretation of Catholic social teaching in viewpoints last week. Therefore, I believe a little refresher in Catholic teaching taken straight from the Catechism is in order. Several people have argued that the Church teaches there is nothing wrong with the fact that someone has homosexual inclinations.This is false, and the Catechism says so: “The [homosexual] inclination, which is objectively disordered, constitutes for most of them a trial.” Homosexuality is wrong in that it is objectively disordered, based upon the natural law and human nature. However we must be clear, homosexual inclinations are disordered, not sinful in themselves. The sin only occurs when an individual takes action on these inclinations.

For heterosexuals and homosexuals alike, engaging in impure sexual thoughts or engaging in sex acts outside marriage are mortal sins. Since homosexual inclinations are not sinful if they are not acted upon, we should not condemn a homosexual person simply because they are homosexual. We need to support our homosexual brothers and sisters, not condemn them. “They must be accepted with respect, compassion and sensitivity. Every unjust discrimination should be avoided.” We must not be homophobic or encourage hateful attitudes towards homosexuals. At the same time, we should not promote or encourage homosexuality or homosexual behavior.

In permitting homosexual groups, or recognition in the non-discrimination policy, we must not simply create a culture of “toleration” and leave it at that. That would be a failure of our Catholic Mission. We should help our homosexual brothers and sisters to live chastely (like we all should), and encourage them that “by prayer and sacramental grace, they can and should gradually and resolutely approach Christian perfection.” This is what groups like Core Council should seek to accomplish. Notre Dame is still a Catholic university, and as such, it has a solemn duty to teach and impart the teachings of the Catholic Church, particularly with regards to the natural law, on its students. And until Notre Dame comes toppling down from the golden dome, it should remain that way.

Andrew Lynch

freshman

Morrissey Manor

Oct. 11