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Belittling humanities

Christopher Damian | Tuesday, November 10, 2009

 I would like to take classes over the summer in order to get my requirements out of the way. I met with my advisor, and he explained that math, science and related classes could not be taken at other universities for credit. However, I could take philosophy, history and theology at other universities.

Does this seem contrary to the nature of a Catholic university? Science and mathematics are mostly objective courses. These subjects can be taught similarly at most universities. However, as a Catholic university, philosophy, history and theology are directed and influenced by Truth, by the Catholic faith. Or, at least, they should be.

So why can humanities be taken at other schools, while math and sciences cannot be taken? I have heard that argument that this is because math and science are taught better here than at other universities, thus we would not accept credit from other schools. So, are philosophy, history and theology not better here than, or at least different from, other schools? Are they not influenced by the Truth that is inhibited at secular universities? What does this say about our university? As we are being constantly accused of secularization, how is this aiding our Catholic identity?
 
Perhaps it is time to reevaluate. While the Catholic identity can be present in all disciplines, it is most obvious in the humanities. Perhaps we should take them more seriously.
 
Christopher Damian
freshman 
Dillon
Nov. 8

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The Observer is a Student-run, daily print & online newspaper serving Notre Dame & Saint Mary's. Learn more about us.

-

archive

Belittling humanities

Christopher Damian | Tuesday, November 10, 2009

I would like to take classes over the summer in order to get my requirements out of the way. I met with my advisor, and he explained that math, science and related classes could not be taken at other universities for credit. However, I could take philosophy, history and theology at other universities.

Does this seem contrary to the nature of a Catholic university? Science and mathematics are mostly objective courses. These subjects can be taught similarly at most universities. However, as a Catholic university, philosophy, history and theology are directed and influenced by Truth, by the Catholic faith. Or, at least, they should be.

So why can humanities be taken at other schools, while math and sciences cannot be taken? I have heard that argument that this is because math and science are taught better here than at other universities, thus we would not accept credit from other schools. So, are philosophy, history and theology not better here than, or at least different from, other schools? Are they not influenced by the Truth that is inhibited at secular universities? What does this say about our university? As we are being constantly accused of secularization, how is this aiding our Catholic identity?

Perhaps it is time to reevaluate. While the Catholic identity can be present in all disciplines, it is most obvious in the humanities. Perhaps we should take them more seriously. 

Christopher Damian

freshman

Dillon

Nov. 8