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Blood drive held at SMC

Ashley Charnley | Wednesday, December 2, 2009

The Office of Civil and Social Engagement (OCSE) gave students the opportunity to save lives with a Red Cross blood drive in the Student Center lounge from noon until 6 p.m. yesterday.

Olivia Barzydlo Critchlow, assistant director of OCSE, said this is the second blood drive of the year, and this drive is being used to kick-off OCSE’s 12 Days of Christmas.
“We did this because it’s another way to give back,” Critchlow said.

OCSE had a goal of collecting 80 units of blood during the six-hour drive. Lizzy Pugh, a senior who volunteered her help with the drive, said over 100 students had set up appointments for the day.

Critchlow said they raised their goal this time because the previous target was “exceeded by an astounding percent.”

There were also chances for prizes for the donor who could get the most referrals. An e-mail was sent out to the students encouraging them to bring others with them. The student with the most referrals at the end of the day would receive a long-sleeve T-shirt.

Donating blood takes about 10 to 12 minutes, Critchlow said, and the whole process takes about an hour for students.

Pugh said this gives students the opportunity to conveniently give back.
“This gives students the chance to give back in an easy way and in a comfortable environment,” Pugh said.

Some students have donated a few times before.

Sophomore Emily Schmitt said she donates because she has a rare blood type, and feels the need to.

“It doesn’t hurt me, and it helps people,” Schmitt said.

She suggests students eat and drink a lot before they come to give blood, but to keep in mind that it isn’t a bad experience.

A couple of first time donors agree with Schmitt, and said they would return again.
Senior Margaret Burke said she would definitely do it again. She said everyone there was helpful and made her feel comfortable.

“[The nurses] were all really nice and cared how I was feeling,” Burke said.

Morgan Gay, a junior at the College, said she would also give blood again. She also suggested eating and drinking before donating and to know your blood history.

According to the e-mail Critchlow sent out, every two seconds someone in the U.S. needs blood and more than 38,000 blood donations are needed each day.
“It’s just an hour of you day, and you can give so much,” Pugh said.