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Eleven arrested at Irish Row

Madeline Buckley | Tuesday, January 25, 2011

A party bust at the Irish Row apartment complex early Friday morning resulted in 11 arrests and about nine citations, according to South Bend police logs.

The roundup is one of the largest since student arrests for underage drinking spiked early in this school year. Police arrested about 70 students through late August and early September, prompting meetings between University officials, student government and the South Bend Police Department in September.

Det. Sgt. Ian McQueen said police received a complaint for a noisy party at the complex on Vaness Street about 1 a.m. Friday. Upon entering the party, the supervising officer decided to arrest minors with a BAC of .05 or higher. Police cited the minors with a lower BAC and allowed them to leave the party. Officers also issued citations for hosting a loud party and contributing to the delinquency minors.

McQueen said the decision to arrest or cite is usually left to the discretion of the arresting officers.

“We responded to a call, and we are duty bound to investigate if we see a crime being committed,” McQueen said.

Police also arrested three students early Saturday morning on Notre Dame Avenue for minor consumption, according to police logs.

Police received a complaint after the students banged on the door of a residential house. The students — who said they had previously been at an off-campus party — were taken to the St. Joseph County Jail.

Vice President for Student Affairs Fr. Tom Doyle said the University and the police department continue to work together on the issue of student arrests.

“We are still actively in communication with multiple community agencies about these matters,” he said.

Doyle said he recently met with student body president Catherine Soler and vice president Andrew Bell to outline goals for the coming semester, and the safety of students off campus remains a priority.

The student arrests this week are a reminder that fostering a healthy relationship between the city and the students requires continued attention, Doyle said.

“I think it is accurate to say that the University and its students have made significant progress since last summer,” he said. “But we cannot take for granted the fragile place that we have come from.”