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The indulgence generation

Christopher Weber | Monday, November 28, 2011

“HAPPY BIRTHDAY TO THE BEST ROOMIE! Get ready for me to get you WASTED tonight” stated what appeared to be an average Facebook post. A lack of comments suggested that no one seemed to have found this post out of the ordinary. It’s sad to see my generation in this state, a state in which an over-indulgent amount of drinking is necessary to have fun, a state in which the night is not a success until one has “hooked up.” We belittle the consequences of our actions by choosing to overlook our better judgment.

This state applies to more than just our college lives. I find the frequency at which we tell white lies is increasing. I have noticed a laxness in academic honesty in all levels of education, and one can’t help but see more examples such as avoiding some of the harder conversations with friends and family because that may be slightly unpleasant. Many, but not all, of my generation are losing sight of the importance of self-respect, honesty and health because we can convince ourselves that these actions are no big deal. Our peers are okay with it, so it can’t be that huge of a deal, right?

Newsflash: This behavior is not acceptable just because we can tell ourselves that it’s okay. This behavior does have harmful consequences that impact our safety, our relationships and yes, our future. More than likely, some of us won’t know when to say enough alcohol is enough instead of enjoying a drink with good company, while others of us will be unable to have children because some of our bodies will be ravaged beyond repair due to STDs from previous hook-ups.

A part of me believes that no one commented on that birthday post because we know better than we let on, but are too afraid to judge and tackle these social norms. I hope to live in a future where we look out for the whole well-being of ourselves and others and call out our fallacies. This piece is my first step toward getting there.

Christopher Weber

freshman

St. Edward’s Hall

Nov. 22