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Group reviews bike shop

Nicole Toczauer | Monday, March 26, 2012

Members of Campus Life Council (CLC) reviewed a resolution Monday proposing the revival of the Campus Bike Shop.

The resolution specifies the bike shop would aim to provide a sustainable model for students to access free repair services using salvaged parts from abandoned and damaged bikes.

John Sanders, residence life director for student government, said the resolution was a response to the Dec. 31 closure of the bike shop. He said the Design department moved into the space where the shop was previously housed.

“In some way, shape or form, the idea is to keep [the bike shop] a free service, as well as sustainable,” he said. “The University loses something by losing the bike shop.”

The shop, which used unclaimed bike parts collected by Notre Dame Security Police (NDSP), requires approximately $7,000 a year from its budget, Sanders said.

The costs cover the price of tools, special-order bike parts and standard wages for student technicians.

“It’s mostly a matter of space on campus,” Sanders said. “[But] it’s becoming a matter of budget as well now because NDSP has revised their budgeting for the year since [the bike shop closed].”

Sister Carrine Etheridge, rector of Farley Hall, said a bike auction could generate money for the shop.

“They used to just auction [bikes] off,” she said. “You would pay a certain amount and then you’d have a tier of bikes you could choose from. That’s one answer to any funding problems.”

Student body president Pat McCormick said CLC will vote on the resolution next Monday.

Members of CLC also discussed possible spaces in which to reopen the shop. Sanders said advocates are considering a space behind Stepan Center.

“There’s the option of using the back restroom of Stepan,” he said. “It’s a disaster, but they’re cleaning it out right now. The problem is how long are we going to have Stepan?”

McCormick said the resolution could represent student advocacy and make it easier for students to access a bike repair shop.

“Our concern is many students, particularly freshmen and sophomores, have no means of going off campus except a taxi,” he said. “The resolution could serve as a way to indicate how we could continue a bike shop that has been a service to students and staff over the past few years.”

Sanders said comments and questions can be sent to savethebikeshop@gmail.com.

-

The Observer is a Student-run, daily print & online newspaper serving Notre Dame & Saint Mary's. Learn more about us.

-

archive

Group reviews bike shop

Nicole Toczauer | Monday, March 26, 2012

Members of Campus Life Council (CLC) reviewed a resolution Monday proposing the revival of the Campus Bike Shop.

The resolution specifies the bike shop would aim to provide a sustainable model for students to access free repair services using salvaged parts from abandoned and damaged bikes.

John Sanders, residence life director for student government, said the resolution was a response to the Dec. 31 closure of the bike shop. He said the Design department moved into the space where the shop was previously housed.

“In some way, shape or form, the idea is to keep [the bike shop] a free service, as well as sustainable,” he said. “The University loses something by losing the bike shop.”

The shop, which used unclaimed bike parts collected by Notre Dame Security Police (NDSP), requires approximately $7,000 a year from its budget, Sanders said. The costs cover the price of tools, special-order bike parts and standard wages for student technicians.

“It’s mostly a matter of space on campus,” Sanders said. “[But] it’s becoming a matter of budget as well now because NDSP has revised their budgeting for the year since [the bike shop closed].”

Sister Carrine Etheridge, rector of Farley Hall, said a bike auction could generate money for the shop.

“They used to just auction [bikes] off,” she said. “You would pay a certain amount and then you’d have a tier of bikes you could choose from. That’s one answer to any funding problems.”

Student body president Pat McCormick said CLC will vote on the resolution next Monday.

Members of CLC also discussed possible spaces in which to reopen the shop. Sanders said advocates are considering a space behind Stepan Center.

“There’s the option of using the back restroom of Stepan,” he said. “It’s a disaster, but they’re cleaning it out right now. The problem is how long are we going to have Stepan?”

McCormick said the resolution could represent student advocacy and make it easier for students to access a bike repair shop.

“Our concern is many students, particularly freshmen and sophomores, have no means of going off campus except a taxi,” he said. “The resolution could serve as a way to indicate how we could continue a bike shop that has been a service to students and staff over the past few years.”

Sanders said comments and questions can be sent to savethebikeshop@gmail.com.

-

The Observer is a Student-run, daily print & online newspaper serving Notre Dame & Saint Mary's. Learn more about us.

-

archive

Group reviews bike shop

Nicole Toczauer | Monday, March 26, 2012

Members of Campus Life Council (CLC) reviewed a resolution Monday proposing the revival of the Campus Bike Shop.

The resolution specifies the bike shop would aim to provide a sustainable model for students to access free repair services using salvaged parts from abandoned and damaged bikes.

John Sanders, residence life director for student government, said the resolution was a response to the Dec. 31 closure of the bike shop. He said the Design department moved into the space where the shop was previously housed.

“In some way, shape or form, the idea is to keep [the bike shop] a free service, as well as sustainable,” he said. “The University loses something by losing the bike shop.”

The shop, which used unclaimed bike parts collected by Notre Dame Security Police (NDSP), requires approximately $7,000 a year from its budget, Sanders said. The costs cover the price of tools, special-order bike parts and standard wages for student technicians.

“It’s mostly a matter of space on campus,” Sanders said. “[But] it’s becoming a matter of budget as well now because NDSP has revised their budgeting for the year since [the bike shop closed].”

Sister Carrine Etheridge, rector of Farley Hall, said a bike auction could generate money for the shop.

“They used to just auction [bikes] off,” she said. “You would pay a certain amount and then you’d have a tier of bikes you could choose from. That’s one answer to any funding problems.”

Student body president Pat McCormick said CLC will vote on the resolution next Monday.

Members of CLC also discussed possible spaces in which to reopen the shop. Sanders said advocates are considering a space behind Stepan Center.

“There’s the option of using the back restroom of Stepan,” he said. “It’s a disaster, but they’re cleaning it out right now. The problem is how long are we going to have Stepan?”

McCormick said the resolution could represent student advocacy and make it easier for students to access a bike repair shop.

“Our concern is many students, particularly freshmen and sophomores, have no means of going off campus except a taxi,” he said. “The resolution could serve as a way to indicate how we could continue a bike shop that has been a service to students and staff over the past few years.”

Sanders said comments and questions can be sent to savethebikeshop@gmail.com.