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Africana Studies bulletin board vandalized

| Sunday, April 27, 2014

An Africana Studies department bulletin board displaying quotes by political commentator Ann Coulter was defaced with red paint over Easter weekend.

University spokesman Dennis Brown said Notre Dame Security Police (NDSP) was investigating the incident as an act of vandalism.

The bulletin board, which remains outside the office on the third floor of O’Shaughnessey Hall, contains several of Coulter’s comments on issues such as race, gender and religion, displayed under the heading “Freedom of Speech, Freedom to Hate: There is a difference.” Gayle Wilson, the administrative assistant and office coordinator for the Africana Studies department, said an unknown person painted messages responding to specific pieces of the board and painting messages such as “What exactly is PC?” and “Don’t be bullied by the ‘Happy Police.’” 

Wilson said the board, which two student office employees made, was put up the day before Coulter’s April 10 talk. She said the defacement occurred by the time a coworker walked by the display April 21. Wilson learned of the vandalism the following day and called NDSP. 

In a statement to The Observer, Rev. Hugh Page, chair of the Africana Studies department, said he was “deeply saddened” by the incident. 

“Such action is clearly inconsistent with the values we espouse as a community of faith and learning,” he said. “I want to congratulate the students and staff whose creative energies are reflected in the board, which seeks to raise awareness. … Their work is resonant with a long and honored tradition of social engagement among Africana artists.” 

The Africana Studies bulletin board, which was vandalized over Easter weekend, will remain on display until the end of the year. Emily McConville | The Observer

The Africana Studies bulletin board, which was vandalized over Easter weekend, will remain on display until the end of the year.

Africana Studies Club president Alex Rice said she was disappointed with the perpetrator’s unwillingness to participate in reasoned dialogue about the issues the bulletin board raised. 

“I wasn’t angry, I would say. I was more disappointed than anything because the Africana Studies department really prides itself on trying to start dialogue,” Rice said. “What happened — an obvious act of vandalism — it wasn’t trying to start dialogue or hear the other side. 

“It was really, we don’t agree with you; we’re going to say so in a very disrespectful manner.” 

Alex Coccia, student body president emeritus and Africana Studies major, said the discipline is “an inherently socially and politically active experience.”

“Given this reality within Africana Studies, it is unfortunate that the display was vandalized,” he said. “We have to be willing to see the world as it was, because our current environment is a product of that world. We cannot ignore these facts when we engage in discussions about rhetoric and how it utilizes historically volatile connotations.

“Speaking more loudly than other voices, the verbal equivalent of painting over the Africana Studies display, does nothing to further constructive dialogue,” Coccia said. “There is nothing wrong with engaging in a heated debate, in fact, heated debates are more powerful than cold, calculated analytics, because they evoke the passions of a community. … But even in disagreement, we cannot disparage or disrespect.” 

Rice said the incident was a topic at this month’s Finally Friday, a monthly discussion series hosted by the Africana Studies Club.

She said the group, which included students and faculty, discussed ways to improve the quality of dialogue about race and speech on campus and increase the amount of discussions with people on multiple sides of an issue. She said the consensus among the attendees was that the board should remain on display until the end of the year.  

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About Emily McConville

Emily McConville is a news writer and photographer for the Observer. She is a senior studying history and Italian with a minor in journalism. She is from Louisville, KY and lives off-campus.

Contact Emily
  • William Wilson

    The individuals who did this misunderstand the Constitution’s First Amendment. That Amendment prohibits only the government from preventing someone from speaking. It has nothing to do with the speech that the Department exercised in criticizing Ms. Coulter’s statements. Indeed, the act of vandalizing the display is more akin to censorship than speech. A better approach would have been to create their own response and post it nearby.

    William L. Wilson
    Class of 1988

  • Cait Listro

    Disgusting. I’m proud of my alma mater in many ways, but I’m consistently disappointed by ND’s response to racial issues. I went to a school that promised inclusion, community, and kindness. I also went to a school where black students were so exasperated having their qualifications questioned that they printed “I am not an athlete shirts”. That someone would deface a board condemning hate speech–that’s bullying, and censorship, and disregard for the voices of the oppressed. “This is important: to get to know people, listen, expand the circle of ideas. The world is crisscrossed by roads that come closer together and move apart, but the important thing is that they lead towards the Good.” That’s Pope Francis. Listen. Don’t stamp out someone else’s voice.
    I hope that ND will take this in the seriousness it should be taken, but I also fear that it will be one of those momentary Observer editorial wars, forgotten.

    Cait Listro
    Class of 2011