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Join the movement

| Friday, January 22, 2016

To Br. Bill Mewes,

I’m glad to hear you agree that black lives matter. That such a statement could be controversial is one of the more depressing realities of today. Despite your agreement, you take issue with the efforts of the movement, particularly the focus on police brutality. Unfortunately, the equivalencies you drew are false and, frankly, patronizing.

For example, your claim that protestors did not seem to worry about black-on-black killings is an insult to the social workers, activists, teachers and others working daily to stop violence and murder. And while there may be more black people killed by black people than by police, that misrepresents the problem. Simply put, people tend to murder their neighbors, and people tend to live amongst those of the same race. Yet no news anchor would summon a prominent white politician and demand to know what they are doing about the violence in their community.

Furthermore, murder is a heinous crime, and perpetrators are typically prosecuted to the full extent of the law. The growing #BlackLivesMatter movement is protesting officers of the law abusing their power to commit the same heinous acts they are meant to prevent. And not only are police officers frequently committing crimes against black people, but oftentimes they get away with it. We should expect and demand more from our police and our legal system.

While you may disagree with abortion, as many do, you must recognize that black women who have them are acting of their own volition. No political institution or governing body is forcing the procedure upon them. Again, you conflated an individual act with the widespread failure of a system that should be better.

Opal Tometi, co-founder of the Black Lives Matter movement, gave a powerful call to action in her speech here this week. “My basic advice is to do the work,” she said. “We need everybody on deck for this time in our history.” Black activists and others are working tirelessly to bring about long overdue change and to affirm that black lives matter. Some of the most inspiring people I have ever met are on this campus right now, working for change. As members of the Notre Dame community, as Americans and as human beings, we all have work to do. I hope that next time you criticize the movement, you do it from the inside looking out, not from the outside looking down.

The views expressed in this Letter to the Editor are those of the author and not necessarily those of The Observer.

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About Jack Riedy

Jack Riedy is from Palatine, Illinois, a town with sixty-seven thousand people and no movie theater.

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  • Johnny Whichard

    What’s the change your friends are actually fighting for? Do they have a goal? Do they have a tangible means of measuring success?

    What about all of the black lives that are killed from abortion? You didn’t answer for the lives Mewes mentioned. Do you only care about black lives outside of the womb?

    • Johnny Whichard

      “While you may disagree with abortion, as many do, you must recognize that black women who have them are acting of their own volition. No political institution or governing body is forcing the procedure upon them. Again, you conflated an individual act with the widespread failure of a system that should be better.”

      You need to do your homework on this topic, too…especially, since you’re apparent way of counter-arguing Mewes was to ignore his actual argument. Google Margaret Sanger and look where she strategically placed her “clinics”. FACT: Abortion is an eugenics practice and the largest enemy of the black community in terms of ending human life. So, while women may not be “forced” to get abortions, do you still not see how sick it is that our government is subsidizing an organization that has a history of placing abortion clinics “strategically” in black neighborhoods? How do you keep a minority population as the minority? Stop them from reproducing….that was her mindset…

      If the BLM is going to claim to “represent” the disenfranchised, the oppressed, and the voiceless, why not start with the ultimate victim?

      If you support planned parenthood or abortion, AT ALL, you are contributing to Margaret Sanger’s “Negro Project” and you are contributing to the “population-control” of black people. End. Of. Story.

      • MJ

        “OPINION: Abortion is an eugenics practice and the largest enemy of the black community in terms of ending human life.”

        There, fixed that for ya. As someone once said, everyone is entitled to their own opinion, but they are not entitled to their own facts. That particular assertion in your comment above is an opinion.

        Belief =/= fact.

        • Johnny Whichard

          Name something that kills more black people than abortions in America.

          • Tom Z.

            Cops

          • Johnny Whichard

            Wow…

          • MJ

            Seeing as I’m not the person that asserted that as a fact, the burden of proof is not mine.

            Here’s the thing. I respect your belief and your pro-life passion, Mr. Whichard, I really do. But you and Brother Mewes are totally missing the point of the BLM movement, and the author of this column points out why. The STATE – through it’s police power – is extrajudicially executing African-American men with seeming impunity. To tell BLM activists that that’s okay because they don’t do enough to end abortion or black-on-black violent crime – and then for commenters to gleefully cheer it – is disgustingly patronizing to people who walk the streets in fear. Maybe Brother Mewes didn’t mean it that way, but that’s certainly how some of us interpreted it.

          • Johnny Whichard

            Well, you claimed my fact to be false….so I was asking you what your proof was. Seeing as you can’t provide an answer to my question, I’ll take it you don’t have an answer (and believe it or not, you won’t find one).

            I stand by my original comment on this letter, MJ….maybe you can answer my questions for me:

            “What’s the change your friends are actually fighting for? Do they have a goal? Do they have a tangible means of measuring success?

            What about all of the black lives that are killed from abortion? You didn’t answer for the lives Mewes mentioned. Do you only care about black lives outside of the womb?”

            Per the abortion debate, I suggest reading this, if you are interested in understanding my position: http://www.washingtontimes.com/news/2015/jan/21/j-kenneth-blackwell-black-abortions-a-crisis-in-am/

          • MJ

            What change is being fought for? The right for African Americans NOT to be executed by the police without repercussion. The right for black Americans to be treated with the same dignity that white Americans take for granted.

            I don’t have to answer for the lives Brother Mewes mentioned, because I didn’t question the legitimacy of a movement by asserting a false equivalency (maybe not quite the correct term, but the one that came to mind). That’s the point I’m trying to to make – it seems like you don’t understand how incredibly offensive it is to tell an entire minority that a movement trying to protect themselves from the power of the state isn’t legitimate “because babies”. When you make that assertion, as Brother Mewes did, what you are saying is “you people don’t get to complain about the police killing you because you haven’t done enough yet to stop abortions in your own community.” If you don’t understand how offensive that is, then I can’t really help you see it anyway. But I felt compelled to try and explain it from my interpretation.

            And for what it’s worth, I learned a long time ago to never, ever trust anything written in the Washington Times. Reverend Moon’s “news” paper is fact-challenged, as biased as the cable news channels, and isn’t fit to wipe anyone’s backside with. It has never been a reliable source.

          • Johnny Whichard

            To each their own, MJ. Appreciate you explaining your lines of thinking, even if we won’t persuade each other 🙂

          • MJ

            Agreed, sir, and thank you for fighting the good fight in keeping with your conscience. I respect that.

  • Ganesha_akbar

    Today, orchestrated campaigns of deadly anti-white violence are spreading under the racial arsonist inspiration of Obama’s Liberation Theology doctrine:

    Black theology refuses to accept a God who is not identified totally with the goals of the black community. If God is not for us and against white people, then he is a murderer, and we had better kill him. The task of black theology is to kill Gods who do not belong to the black community… Black theology will accept only the love of God which participates in the destruction of the white enemy. What we need is the divine love as expressed in Black Power, which is the power of black people to destroy their oppressors here and now by any means at their disposal. Unless God is participating in this holy activity, we must reject his love.”

    Black Lives Matter activists are inspried by Obama who spent the last quarter century worshiping a god committed to “the destruction of the white enemy.” Why would any rational person exult these neo-Goebbels racial arsonists?