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The fascination with parodies

| Wednesday, December 7, 2016

Move over, Spinal Tap. Step aside, The Rutles. Bow down, “Weird Al” Yankovic.

There’s a new parody group rocking the nation — or at least the basement of South Dining Hall — and it doesn’t want any “tidings of bias and lies” to let you think otherwise.

The Super PAC — a clever abbreviation for Punk A– Catholics, which is the most punk or Catholic this risible trio gets — have changed the game, mixing instrumentals they probably violated copyright laws using with atonal vocals to create songs of a quality that has never been heard before.

Looking for rap parodies that drop lines like “I love hard classes, that’s my AP problem,” rhymes “now” with “cash cow” in a song about the Fed and displays other instances of lyrical genius by songwriter Marek Mazurek? Yearning for Christmas songs that bring you back to the political climate of 2013 from the perspective of angsty high school seniors? Then look no further than the two-album set of “It’s a Rap” and “A Politically Correct Christmas.”

Perhaps the best song amongst the two albums is “Shake If Off (Fiscal Responsibility),” which has an impressive 565 plays on SoundCloud — which means 20 people have listened to it a few times and Rachel O’Grady has the other 500-plus plays. Between the catchy lyrics and the random insertion of auto-tune, you will be powerless to, much like Mazurek, have anything but “Keynes on my mind.”

Another timeless classic for those of you who just haven’t been able to get enough of the recent election and hearkens back to the primaries is “Hark the Herald Democrats Sing.” Once again, Mazurek’s pure lyrical genius shows with unforgettable lines like, “She will cut out all the pork and carry the state of New York,” in an ode to Hillary Clinton that might have given her the extra push she needed to win this year had she featured the hit more prominently in her campaign.

The Super PAC isn’t afraid to take its fair share of shots, either. Despite eventually finding himself as a member of the media and pursuing a journalism minor, Mazurek isn’t afraid to go after the very liberal rags he now holds dearest. In “Political Spells (Jingle Bells),” he and his collaborators are critical of those pundits and viewers who only want to see things from their side and consider the other side to be, as they so eloquently put it, “turds.” He takes it one step further in “God Rest Ye Merry Media,” as he warns his 33 listeners thus far against the “tidings of bias and lies” in mainstream media.

The group also shows its diversity and range of skills, as it proves itself capable of creating an entire song using auto-tune with “Political Correctness,” while also getting introspective with its hit song about not being able to remember the very songs it parodies, “I Don’t Know That Song.” And for those seniors whose graduation is quickly approaching, “Cap and Gown” might just give you everything you need to get through that emotional time in your life.

Ultimately, you just can’t sleep on The Super PAC and its musical mastery. Those who have for the last four years have truly missed out. But it’s not too late to give these innovative songs the credit and plays they deserve.

Artist: The Super PAC

Albums: “It’s a Rap” and “A Politically Correct Christmas”

Label: None (For Good Reason)

Recommended Tracks: “Shake If Off (Fiscal Responsibility),” “Hark the Herald Democrats Sing,” and “AP Problems”

If you hate: Music

Shamrocks: 5/5

The views expressed in this column are those of the author and not necessarily those of The Observer.

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About Benjamin Padanilam

As The Observer's Editor-in-Chief, Ben is a senior in the Program of Liberal Studies (PLS) who is pursuing minors in Philosophy, Politics and Economics (PPE) and Business Economics as well. He hails from Toledo, Ohio, and has enjoyed the few highs and many lows of being a Cleveland sports fan.

Contact Benjamin